Book Marketing Tips for Technologically Challenged Authors

Monday, April 02, 2018

One of the questions that I frequently encounter when I speak at writers conferences is: “I'm not tech savvy. Are there other ways to promote your book besides social media?” My answer is always: of course.

Social media is just one tool in an author's book marketing toolbox. There are numerous tools in a toolbox. Over reliance on one tool is not good. After all, not all situations need a screwdriver. In the same respect, not all readers use social media, and social media marketing is not the only way to reach readers.

If you relate to the authors who are not tech savvy or if social media is not your preferred method to promote your book, take heart. There are other tools. Following are five book marketing methods that don't require you to be engaged online.

1. Speaking

Speaking engagements are a powerful marketing tool. The number one reason people purchase a book is because they know the author. The reader may know the author because they have read other books by the author, or they may know the author because they have heard the author speak. Start by finding local speaking engagements with your target audience. All sorts of venues seek speakers. Local rotary clubs, schools, retirement centers and churches are a great place to start.

2. Media Interviews

Radio is still alive and well. If you include online radio shows and podcasts, radio is growing. Every talk radio show needs guests. Research your local radio stations and find those that interview authors. Then approach the show's producer with a request to be a guest. You can also search the largest database of online radio shows at Blog Talk Radio and find shows interviewing guests in your subject matter.

3. Local Print Interviews

Most communities across America either have a local newspaper or magazine for their residents. Many of these publications feature articles about local residents and their interesting ventures. As an author, you qualify as newsworthy. Approach your local magazine or newspaper and let them know that you are a local author to see if they may be interested in featuring you in their publication.

4. Articles

Print is not dead. Over two-thirds of Americans still read print magazines. Magazines are always in need of material. Most magazines accept article submissions from writers. You can write articles related to your book's topic and submit them to magazines for publication. In your byline, be sure to mention that you are an author and include the name of your book. You can find a listing of magazines and the type of articles each one is seeking in the annual Writers Market and its Christian counterpart, the Christian Writers Market Guide.

5. Mailings

Over half of all Americans (56%) say receiving snail mail is a pleasure. Snail mail boasts a higher open rate then email. You can rent a mailing list of your target audience and send out a mailing announcing your book. When my book, The Adoption Option, was published, I rented a mailing list of adoption agencies around the country. I then sent a postcard to each of these agencies with information about my book.

As an author, you have numerous tools at your disposal for book marketing. Although online book marketing is an important piece, all your book marketing does not have to be done online. Be creative. Look around and see what other companies with products are doing in the physical world and mimic their ideas to gain more exposure for your books.

 

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Sarah Bolme

Sarah Bolme is the Director of Christian Small Publishers Association. Through this organization Sarah provides assistance to small publishers and independently published authors marketing books to the Christian marketplace. Sarah is also the author of the award-winning book Your Guide to Marketing Books in the Christian Marketplace, now in its third edition.